Personal Statement Class SALE: 50% OFF!

Sale_signFrom now through July 11, 2016, my Write Your Personal Statement in 7 Days online class is 50% OFF!

That’s right.

Instead of paying $99, you pay only $49.

This is not an April Fool’s joke. After July 11, 2016, I will no longer offer this class, so act today!

You won’t find a better deal for an online personal statement class designed specifically for law school applicants.

But don’t take my word for it. Here’s what my students say:

Wow, I am so happy I took this course. My previous law school application looks elementary compared to the refined personal statement I have recently drafted.  — Carolina

Peg, I wanted to say thank you. I know I am not done with your course yet, but you have been extremely helpful so far. I appreciate you so very, very much. So thank you for doing this and for being you! — Leslie Anne

I was surprised how eye opening the 49 stories exercise was. I helped me categorize and chronologically reflect on a 20 year past of jumbled memories. — Anna

Peg, I have just finished Lesson 1 and I have to hand it to you, these writing exercises have been a good, and certainly cathartic, exercise. At the present time I am feeling good and very hopeful! — Aidan

Completing the 49 stories made me discover that I am a lot more interesting than I presumed to be. Thanks to this class I feel I wrote a concise and clear personal statement. Peg rocks and all her tips are awesome! Put in the work, you won’t be disappointed.  — Daniela

For more student testimonials and to learn more about the class, go here.

With this class, you’ll learn how to write your law school personal statement in just 7 days, and you’ll also get your questions answered online by me.

Once you register for this class, it’s yours to keep. You can view the lessons and videos as many times as you want, 24-7.

All for just $49.

After July 11, 2016, I will no longer offer this class. But, it will still exist for the students who have registered. As long as the class hosting service Ruzuku exists, you can visit this class and its lessons forever on.

Don’t miss out! Last day to sign up is Monday, July 11, 2016. REGISTER NOW!

Sale sign by Martin Abegglen.

Top Ten Mistakes That Law School Applicants Make: #3

map-colorfulThis post continues our 10-part series of posts on the Top Ten Mistakes That Law School Applicants Make.

The #3 Top Ten Mistake That Law School Applicants Make every year is…
THEY DON’T FOLLOW DIRECTIONS.

For example, many applicants think that optional essays are optional.

They are only “optional,” if you do not want to get into that school!

Follow the directions.

If you can reasonably answer the optional essay prompt, you should.

For example, Penn Law has several optional essay prompts. They indicate that “you may answer more than one essay topic if you so choose.” Thus, if there are two essay topics that make sense for you to answer, you should do that. If there are three that make sense for you to answer, go ahead.

You may be thinking, three essays? That seems like an awful lot.

It does. But when you read the prompts, it may not seem so far fetched.

For some applicants, it’s reasonable for them to write an essay for Penn Law’s diversity prompt, for their “Why Penn Law?” prompt, and for the prompt that allows you to explain an academic record or test score that doesn’t reflect their ability to succeed in law school.

That’s three optional essays right there. Not unusual for many of the students I’ve worked with.

I’ll describe another scenario that happens a lot.

Many law schools want you to attach a resume with your application and they also want you to detail your jobs, internships, and extracurriculars within the application.

Seems redundant?

It is. But the reason so many schools do this is because so many applicants write vague and brief resumes.

Don’t do that. Write a detailed, thorough resume and then cut and paste from your resume into the boxes or spaces indicated on the application.

Follow the directions. Give the law schools what they want.

If you’re not sure about something on the application, contact the law school’s admissions office. Find out what they want before you skip a step and possibly jeopardize your application.

Photo Credit: Oran Viriyincy via Compfight cc

Top Ten Mistakes That Law School Applicants Make: #4

CVThis post continues our 10-part series of posts on the Top Ten Mistakes That Law School Applicants Make.

The #4 Top Ten Mistake That Law School Applicants Make every year is…
THEY TURN IN A VAGUE AND BRIEF RESUME.

Your resume does not have to fit on one page.

I repeat.

Your resume does NOT have to fit on one page.

Two full pages is just fine.

In my 12+ years of prelaw advising, almost all of my students have created a two-page resume after realizing that they could. Some had three-page resumes. Very few had one-page resumes. In fact, I can count on one hand the number of students I’ve worked with that had a well-written resume that was only one page.

Why do most people have a two-page resume?

Because they took the time to detail their current and past work experiences and extracurricular activities. They also took the time to format their resume with a minimum of 1/2-inch-margins all round and at least 11-point font.

Detail all jobs, internships, research positions, and extracurriculars after high school graduation. Get specific. Make sure to include the number of hours worked per week at each position. Law school officers really like to have this information.

Take the time to write a resume for law school as if you’re writing a resume for your dream job. Put in the effort and law schools will notice.

For more detailed tips and step-by-step advice, check out my book, The No B.S. Guide to the Law School Resume.

Photo Credit: clinton4grace via Compfight cc

Top Ten Mistakes That Law School Applicants Make: #5

typewriter-turquoiseThis post continues our 10-part series of posts on the Top Ten Mistakes That Law School Applicants Make.

The #5 Top Ten Mistake That Law School Applicants Make every year is…
THEY DON’T TAILOR THEIR ESSAYS TO THEIR SCHOOLS’ PROMPTS.

Do they want 12 point font?

Do they want only two pages?

Do they want to know why you want to attend their law school, in addition to hearing your story?

Whatever the law school wants, give it to them.

Follow the directions.

I know it sounds simple but you’d be surprised how many times I’ve reviewed personal statements and supplemental/optional essays that did not match what the law school indicated in their essay prompts.

Read and follow the directions on the application. If the directions don’t make sense, contact the admissions office at the law school. Better to know for sure than to guess.

Photo Credit: The Hammersmith @ Etsy.com via Compfight cc

Top Ten Mistakes That Law School Applicants Make: #6

journal-collageThis post continues our 10-part series of posts on the Top Ten Mistakes That Law School Applicants Make.

The #6 Top Ten Mistake That Law School Applicants Make every year is…
THEY WRITE A PERSONAL STATEMENT THAT ISN’T PERSONAL.

First, let’s get one thing clear. Law schools want a personal statement, not a statement of purpose.

What’s the difference between a personal statement and a statement of purpose?

A personal statement is a story about yourself that reveals your strengths, while a statement of purpose is an essay about the research or academic trajectory you want to accomplish while in graduate school.

So, if a personal statement is a story, what kind of story should you tell?

One that is engaging, memorable, and authentic.

How are you going to do that?

You’re doing to make it personal. You’re going to make it about you.

Almost anything goes when it comes to telling a personal story. You can write about your proudest accomplishment and why you’re proud of it. You can write about an obstacle (or several) that you overcame and how you did it. You can write about a hobby that’s important to you and why it’s important to you.

Get the picture?

In most cases, applicants think back and write about an event, experience, or activity that shaped them and helped them become the person they are today. Remember, it’s a personal statement you want to share, not a statement of purpose.

If you’re wondering how to get started on writing a personal statement, I recommend doing the following.

  1. Read my post Law School Personal Statements (Pt 1): Reading Comes First
  2. Then read Law School Personal Statements (Pt 2): Finding Great Topics
  3. Then read Law School Personal Statements (Pt 3): The First Draft
  4. Lastly, read Law School Personal Statements (Pt 4): Revise, Revise, Revise

Everyone wants to read a good story, especially law school admissions officers. Tell them an engaging, memorable, and personal story about yourself and you’ll have them hooked.

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